Nike Motivates All Women While Working Out With New Ad

Nike has created a brand new campaign named #betterforit and addresses women that need a boost while working out. This time Nike is not just focusing on athletes, but inspires women from all the fitness levels, encouraging them to keep up their athletic journey.

Nike uses the slogan: “If you’re brave enough to try, you’re strong enough to finish” and it’s the perfect way to show their change of focus in advertising, targeting women from all levels, not just athletes and pros, reminding them that a problem always has a solution, provided that you’re willing to find it.

The #BetterForIt campaign started with a 60-second ad, which already airs globally and aims to spread Nike’s new message all over the world.

Nike Motivates All Women While Working Out With New Ad

The ad that was created by Wieden+Kennedy is called “Inner Thoughts” and shows a woman during a spin class, a runner of a half-marathon and another woman trying out yoga. The ad tries to appeal to all the women’s thoughts and insecurities while working out, turning more personal than ever.

Nike seems to value female customers and that’s why they place them on the frontline of their attention, boosting their women’s line from the current $5 billion to another $2 billion sum by 2017. They decided to develop products and services that address their needs and desires and this campaign will be the beginning.

#BetterForIt campaign seems clearly different from the “Just Do It” campaign and the message they were spreading before, but it’s part of an attempt to reach a wider audience, trying to remind to every single woman that there is no perfect exercise, no athlete without insecurities and that everyone needs an extra boost of motivation.

That’s why Nike also launched the “90-day better for it challenge”, combining exercises and workouts from both the Nike+ Training Club app and the Nike+ Running App. What’s more,

they decided to encourage women to share their experiences online by using the #BetterForIt hashtag, in order to discuss their worries with more women that mutually understand each other while exercising.

According to Nike’s press release:

“#betterforit is more than just a hashtag. It’s a call to action to share, promote and embrace women’s fitness and sports. With this rallying cry, Nike invites a global community of athletes to push themselves further, whether it’s a personal best in their latest marathon or a weekend run. #betterforit offers athletes collective inspiration to reach new heights and a place to share their experience.”

Learn more and watch all the short videos here.

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zzbjEMaDjrk]

CREDITS

Client: Sony
Agency: FCB Auckland, New Zealand
Regional Executive Creative Director: James Mok
Executive Creative Directors: Tony Clewett, Regan Grafton
Writer: Peter Vegas
Art Directors: Leisa Wall, Christiaan Van Noppen
Head of Content, Executive Producer: Pip Mayne
Head of Art: Nick Smith
Director, Director of Photography: Michael Braid
Group Account Director: Toby Sellers
Account Director: Hannah Downes
Account Executive: Laura Little
Lead Behaviourist, Animals on Q: Mark Vette
Assistant Handlers, Animals on Q: Jazmin Vette dal Bello, Rosie Miles
Curator, Kelly Tarlton’s Sea Life Aquarium: Andrew Christie
Marketing Manager, Kelly Tarlton’s Sea Life Aquarium: Claire Wheeler
Rig Developers, Harrison & Watkins Ltd.: Harry Harrison, Blair Muchamp
Director of Photography, Event Coverage, Traction Films: Nic Fay
Editor, 6Twenty: Simon Wade
Editor, FCB: Grant Nicholson
Media Director: Rachel Leyland
Media Planner, Buyer: Erin McCaughley
General Manager, Public Relations: Angela Spain
Senior Account Director, Public Relations: Kimberley Kastelan
Digital Director: Kate Grigg
Customer Experiences Director: Ele Quigan
Music Composer: Peter van der Fluit
Music Composition: Liquid Studios
Studio Producer: Sarah Yetton

Sony’s “Octographer” turns an octopus into a photographer!

Sony has decided to take creativity to the next level by training the first octopus to become a photographer. It was Sony New Zealand along with FCB Auckland that decided to train a female octopus named Rambo, teaching her how to use a Sony TX30 compact camera, in order to start taking pictures.

The project was named “The Octographer” and it featured a one-minute video, showing Rambo’s photography skills, along with the training process. The idea of this campaign was both to promote the Cyber Shot TX30 camera, but also to prove the intelligence of octopuses and it seems that both goals have been achieved.

The biggest challenge was to find a way to place the camera on Rambo’s tank, while training her to follow a series of steps to take a photo. Although the Cyber Shot TX30 camera is both water and shock resistant, it was still placed in a waterproof box inside Rambo’s tank, along with a red shutter  extension. What’s impressive is that it took only three attempts for Rambo to understand her training process, completing successfully her two-month training and taking photos with no problem. According to her training, all she had to do was to approach the camera box, use her tentacle, press the shutter and take a photo.

Sony's “Octographer" turns an octopus into a photographer!

Despite the several broken cameras during the process, the result was impressive, with children visiting Rambo, asking her to take a photo. Suddenly her tank at Kelly Tarlton’s Sea Life Aquarium in New Zealand has become an attraction for visitors, especially the younger ones, promoting Rambo as the first octopus that was trained as a photographer.

Moreover, the “Octographer” ad met similar reactions online, combining surprise with interest, leading to 400.000 Youtube views in the first week of the video’s launch and an encouraging media coverage!

Online users have decided to take the ad a step further with their (funny) thoughts:

-This octopus is better than me at taking pictures.

-I wonder if the Octographer can claim copywrite on the photos.

-Sony continues to innovate in the camera world. This time they have a octographer! I’m out of a job then………

The aquarium has decided to charge $2 for every photo that Rambo takes, hoping to raise a significant amount, supporting their conservation programs.

The creativity of the campaign was to think of an interesting ad, succeeding in training an octopus as a photographer for the first time, combining the promotion of the Cyber Shot TX30 camera, while they were also raising awareness about how intelligent an octopus may be.

Here are some of the pictures that Rambo took from her tank:

Sony's “Octographer" turns an octopus into a photographer! primary

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rI9tP3mZfxM]

Behind the scenes:

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vNX-3_3590U]

CREDITS

Client: Sony
Agency: FCB Auckland, New Zealand
Regional Executive Creative Director: James Mok
Executive Creative Directors: Tony Clewett, Regan Grafton
Writer: Peter Vegas
Art Directors: Leisa Wall, Christiaan Van Noppen
Head of Content, Executive Producer: Pip Mayne
Head of Art: Nick Smith
Director, Director of Photography: Michael Braid
Group Account Director: Toby Sellers
Account Director: Hannah Downes
Account Executive: Laura Little
Lead Behaviourist, Animals on Q: Mark Vette
Assistant Handlers, Animals on Q: Jazmin Vette dal Bello, Rosie Miles
Curator, Kelly Tarlton’s Sea Life Aquarium: Andrew Christie
Marketing Manager, Kelly Tarlton’s Sea Life Aquarium: Claire Wheeler
Rig Developers, Harrison & Watkins Ltd.: Harry Harrison, Blair Muchamp
Director of Photography, Event Coverage, Traction Films: Nic Fay
Editor, 6Twenty: Simon Wade
Editor, FCB: Grant Nicholson
Media Director: Rachel Leyland
Media Planner, Buyer: Erin McCaughley
General Manager, Public Relations: Angela Spain
Senior Account Director, Public Relations: Kimberley Kastelan
Digital Director: Kate Grigg
Customer Experiences Director: Ele Quigan
Music Composer: Peter van der Fluit
Music Composition: Liquid Studios
Studio Producer: Sarah Yetton

Diamonds in the Rough: Understanding the Difference between Good Content and Great Content

We live in an age of content overload. Go online and it doesn’t take long before you’re bombarded by content, whether it be text, images, video or a combination of the three. As a result we have developed filters to sift through all that uninteresting noise and lock onto those sparkly little diamonds in the rough that we might well find entertaining.

What exactly differentiates a diamond from say… a lump of coal?

Well ask any geologist and they’ll tell you that they’re both a form of carbon but with different atomic arrangements. The difference then is not in their constituent parts but in how those parts are arranged. Without wishing to labour a scientific metaphor, the difference between good content marketing and great content marketing can be seen in essentially the same way. There’s plenty of good content out there but most of it is essentially like coal; not particularly enticing and notable only by its abundance. Diamonds by their very nature are rare, precious and therefore desirable.

But how do you elevate your content marketing from good to great? What’s the secret of making diamonds when everyone around you is shovelling coal?

Create a Feeling, Leave an Impression

What makes great content though? What makes us, not just sit up and take notice, but share it, talk about it down the pub, go and seek out more of the same?
The answer is to do with our feelings. Good content entertains. Great content makes us feel something, whether that be sadness, joy, pride, humour, arousal, shock, a sense of wonder, beauty, awe, unease, patriotism, individualism, identity… The list could go on, but at its heart this is about stirring base emotions in people. Using logical reasoning is a tried and tested method of convincing people to buy your product or service but creating an emotional response in someone does something far more; it leaves an impression. And creating impressions is what brand marketing is all about. Impressions last. Impressions can be recalled. Most importantly, impressions can – over a period of time – influence and effect behaviour.

[Hurricane Media‘s video for Airbus Defense and Space creates a sense of concern, paternity and ideas of stewardship on a global level to push a powerful brand message.]

Entertain don’t Sell

John Deere was one of the early pioneers of content marketing. He knew that he would never make his fortune by knocking on people’s doors and trying to sell them things. Deere realised that if he wrote a publication that people enjoyed reading, people would turn to it for entertainment, information and advice. It would educate them about his products and how to use them and solve the difficulties they faced in agriculture. His company was to become a trusted household name due in part to his content marketing strategy.

Although the multitude of channels within which to put your message across has changed beyond all compare at its heart content marketing hasn’t really changed since Deere’s time. Entertain someone and you could be doing so much more than just selling them something; you could be creating a brand advocate, who will go on to spread the word about your company far and wide.

Walking the Fine Line between Irrelevancy and Corporate Alienation

Making original and entertaining content is hard enough but creating content that is this and at the same time somehow chimes with the themes and ideals of your brand, without every putting off your audience is a very careful balancing act to pull off. Content marketers constantly walk the fine line between irrelevancy and corporate alienation. People these days are extremely savvy and can quickly tell when they’re being advertised to and so will switch off if they can. Understanding how to subtly embed messages in the subtext of your content is a tricky skill to master. Go too far, and your message might be lost completely, go too easy and it all becomes too obvious and we’re back to crude salesmanship again.

Follow the Zeitgeist

Understanding your audience, is quoted again and again in countless guides to content marketing for the simple reason that it is one of the hardest things to really do effectively. Brands both big and small like to think they know their audience but this is very rarely the case. It’s inevitable that marketers will become detached to a certain degree and as a result content campaigns can become top down affairs, where content is dreamt up in shut off rooms full of beanbags by marketers convinced they understand what their audience wants, when their audience moved on to the next big thing years ago.

[Guerrilla marketing set piece pranks are nothing new but Turner Broadcasting Systems went bigger and bolder than many before it with their remarkable “A Dramatic Surprise on a Quiet Square” viral video in Belgium, which was also repeated in the Netherlands.]

Great content has an ability to tap into current trends and tropes and present them in a new light or from a new angle. Very rarely do marketers find themselves in a position where they can control the zeitgeist; the trick is to merely respond to it so quickly and in such a way that no one can really tell the difference.

Be the Zeitgeist

All fashions and trends are the product of the social and cultural paradigms from which they emerge and from time to time, brands can find themselves in the driving seat of the next big thing. This doesn’t happen out of the blue. Brands like Volvo and Redbull have become very good at putting together elaborate stunts that at once celebrate the skills and guts of certain adrenaline seeking people, whilst associating their brand with this form of marketing.

Volvo’s now legendary Epic Split video with Van Damme, managed to show off Volvo’s Dynamic Steering technology whilst leaving viewers jaws on the floor at the tenacity of the stunt used to do so.

Through their sponsorship of adrenaline sports like cliff diving, BMX and air racing, Redbull have become synonymous with these kinds of slickly produced videos that regularly attract millions of views.

This attraction we have to watching real life situations where there is real danger, also lies at the heart of guerrilla marketing, which seeks to capture real emotions from real people in (seemingly) real situations. Some brands have spent millions on getting very very good at this and as a result they have earned the ability to be the zeitgeist. When other people are creating content that references or pays homage to your content, you know you’ve created a diamond!

Jon Mowat is a former BBC film maker and now runs British based video production and marketing company, Hurricane Media and has created video marketing campaigns for many well known brands like Canon, Sony, BMW and Peugeot. You can follow Hurricane on Google+, Twitter, Facebook or check out their YouTube Channel.

4 Irrefutable Social Media Marketing Tips Just In Time For The World Cup

In a world of status updates, hashtags and check-ins, it’d be pretty difficult to avoid traces of the 2014 World Cup even if you tried.

A recent study by Media Bistro claims that over 3.6 billion people will be watching the global sporting event this year, or, half the world. The games have brought with them the biggest social media following in history, beating out even the Sochi Olympics and the 2014 Super Bowl.

In the United States vs. Ghana game alone, there were over 4.9 million tweets, or over 54,000 tweets a minute for 90 minutes, and the Brazil vs. Mexico game brought in 8.9 million tweets— almost 100,000 a minute. Whether you love or despise soccer, you can run, but if you use social media, you can’t hide.

Facebook estimates that 500 million of its 1.28 billion users, or 40%, are soccer fans. Additionally, Adobe found that “59% of the social buzz for World Cup relates to Admiration, Joy, or Anticipation for the event.”

Many companies are taking advantage of this large, temporary uptick in social media by taking their social media marketing efforts to the next level. The perhaps most well-known competition is between Adidas’ “All in or Nothing” effort and Nike’s “Risk Everything” campaign.

As the official sponsor of the World Cup, another large contender is Sony’s “ONE STADIUM LIVE” online initiative, which integrates all World Cup activity from Facebook, Twitter and Google+ and displays it all in one place. You can even filter by topic, time or relevancy. Sony believes that this enhanced user experience takes social media engagement to the next level.

If you’re wondering how to utilize this social media momentum to increase your own company’s brand awareness, here are a few tips to get you started.

1. Keep a Consistent Schedule.

One of the biggest reasons users lose interest in a brand is due to the brand’s lack of consistency and frequency of advertising. People opt for brands they’re familiar with, and they’ll never become familiar with your brand unless you can first lure them in and then keep them. Put together a content calendar, and begin by focusing on only 2-3 social platforms at first.

2. Focus On Personal Engagement.

People enjoy feeling involved. They like knowing that they are interacting with real humans versus just a big money-sucking corporation, and they like feeling appreciated. If you’re having a hard time gaining followers, consider giving the person an incentive to follow or “like” your brand, and add in a personal touch if possible. Consider making a fun game that users can participate in, and offer actual prizes to the winners. Personalization and rewards both go a long way for customer loyalty.

3. Be Interesting.

Although your end goal is to have more people purchase your product or service, people are much more likely to warm up to your brand if you offer them useful information simply for the sake of doing so. If everything you post has the clear memo of “buy now,” your brand will come off as greedy instead of helpful. While it’s sometimes okay to do this, you need to vary your posts with legitimately useful content and information that readers will enjoy viewing. If they enjoy what you post, they’ll continue to read your content, and better yet, they may even share it with others, furthering your brand’s scope. You can even attempt humor, only if you know it’s actually funny— it’s easy to go wrong when attempting to make online users laugh.

4. Track Data.

There’s no point in spending time making a social media campaign if you have no way to track its success. Utilizing services such as Sumall lets you easily track how much of your site’s traffic derived from social media, and more importantly, how much money the campaign brought in.

There’s no better time than the World Cup to jump onto the social media bandwagon, and by doing so the right way, it may make all the difference for your company.

Experiential Marketing & Staffing Company the Hype Agency Hires Veteran Jon Genese as SVP

Jon GeneseBoston, MA/ Los Angeles, CA (February 12, 2014) — The Hype Agency, the nationwide marketing and staffing company, announced today they have hired veteran marketer Jon Genese as Senior Vice President, General Manager of the company. This role was created in response to an increasing number of clients, and to solidify Hype’s position as the marketplace leader for not only experiential event staffing and talent management, but also as a comprehensive execution agency partner. Hype recently unveiled its new logo and website to reflect this bold new image, which still maintains the true spirit of the agency.

In addition to expanding Hype’s client portfolio, Genese’s role will consist of client relationship management, marketing program innovation and creation, as well as cultivating Hype’s capabilities and services, including execution partnership, digital platform integration and experiential reporting and analytics.

“Hype is in a unique position as the experiential marketing landscape continues to evolve with technology advancements.  The foundation of the agency is in the human connection but with a core focus of building on this strength with technology both consumer facing and back-end training and reporting. It’s time to believe-the-HYPE, I believe,” said Genese.

Genese has over 18 years of experience leading brands to excellence. Before joining Hype, he spent the last 8 years at AMP Agency holding several senior management leadership roles from SVP, Account Management to SVP, General Manager.  Over that period he ran the Account Management and Event Operation teams along with other strategic business units such as Media, Creative, Technology and Brand Planning.

“Jon is a problem-solver and a rainmaker,” said Kate Bright, Co-Founder of The Hype Agency. “He has a relentless dedication to serving clients. His knowledge of experiential marketing, talent management, digital platforms and social media strategy marries perfectly with Hype’s mission of flawless execution and true partnership- and he likes to have fun in the process!”

About The Hype Agency

The Hype Agency provides event staffing and experiential event execution partnership for its marketing agency clients. Founded in 2006 by entrepreneurs Kate Bright & Dayna Gilchrist, the agency currently houses offices in both Salem, NH and Los Angeles, CA.

The “HYPE Effect” – there’s a moment when a brand ambassador and consumer meet. It’s a critical moment—one that we take a lot of time to consider and analyze. Because we know that having just the right person, the right message and the right experience can make that moment perfect, lasting long after the initial engagement. And that is what we call the “Hype Effect”—an experience that ignites conversation and propels your brand.

Hype’s has executed experiential marketing programs for a wide array of brands, including: Target, Delta, Dove, Google, L’Oréal , PepsiCo , Toyota, Nike, Sony, and Anheuser Busch ; Entertainment industry for movie studios and television networks such as Paramount, Fox, Disney, Universal, ABC, NBC, USA, and Nickelodeon.