Vodafone Romania Launches “Sunday Grannies” to Beat Loneliness

How do you reach an audience that is not your usual target group, in a way that is also listening to their actual needs? Vodafone Romania has decided to approach the senior Romanian citizens in a very touching way!

It is estimated that there are over 4 million people over 75 that live alone in Romania, asking for a human connection, a way to somehow beat their lonely moments. Parents and grandparents tend to feel alone and that’s why Vodafone took on the challenge to use technology and mobile Internet in order to fight loneliness.

Vodafone Romania launches “Sunday Grannies" to beat loneliness

That’s how they decided to experiment with an unusual campaign named “Sunday Grannies”, featuring two widowed grannies that live together, wishing there were more people joining their home. Despite their loneliness, they are used in cooking for large tables and this inspired the concept of the campaign. Vodafone along with McCann Romania have decided to connect these two lonely grannies with students that miss home-cooked meals, in an attempt to keep everyone happy.

Vodafone Romania launches “Sunday Grannies" to beat loneliness

Hence, they showed them the basics of social networks, they created a Facebook Page for them and they updated it every Sunday with their meal of the week, inviting students that wanted to join them. Just like that, their page saw an impressive growth, reaching more than 430k likes, turning into the second largest campaign page in the country. The two lonely grannies suddenly got digitally savvy, finding a purpose in life, cooking and meeting new people. Suddenly the empty apartment turned into the hottest spot in the city, flooding with people every Sunday and gaining new likes every day through their Facebook page!

Vodafone Romania launches “Sunday Grannies" to beat loneliness

As if this wasn’t enough, “Sunday Grannies” became a documentary that played in television, they were asked for interviews, they hosted tables even to celebrities, they launched on all supermarkets their famous lemon pie, while they even started producing their own cooking show! Nobody could imagine that an experiment could turn so successful, with Vodafone and McCann taking it a step further through Facebook, by creating a special app that invites more grannies from all over the country to turn into Sunday hosts. This inspired so many others throughout the country, filling their homes again full of happy people, using their cooking skills for good!

Vodafone Romania launches “Sunday Grannies" to beat loneliness

According to Vodafone Romania, this smart campaign reached over 380 million media impressions, with a tripling social media adoption rate among seniors and an impressive growth of 78.8% on the purchase of 4G smartphones. What’s more, it even led to an increase of 20% in the creation of Facebook accounts by Romanians that are over 65, proving that technology may indeed connect people and bring them closer, even if they didn’t previously know each other.

Vodafone Romania launches “Sunday Grannies" to beat loneliness

Vodafone and McCann experimented with an inspiring initiative that was different from any other campaign, focusing on people, rather than the product, proving with its success that social good and smiles on people’s faces are the best ROI for a brand!

CREDITS

Advertising Agency: McCann, Bucharest, Romania

5 Top Agencies To Follow in 2015

It’s a brand new year and we’re so excited to see what creative marketing campaigns come out this year. Last year we saw some really great campaigns come out that had us WOWed. This year, we put together a list of creative agencies that we plan on following based on their work the previous year. We selected these particular agencies because of some of the memorable campaigns and executions back in 2014. We’re very excited to see what they come up with this year! So without further adieu, the 5 top agencies to follow in 2015.

1) Duval Guillaume

duvalguillaumelogo2015

Rocking a brand spanking new website, this agency is one to be on the watch list. They are most known for the “Push to add drama” campaigns back in 2012, but have also done some very stellar work in 2014 such as the selfie speeding sign and the border football campaign for Carlsberg.

2) Forsman & Bodenfors

Forsman-&-Bodenfors-Logo

Most well known for their work with Volvo and the Epic Split with Jean-Claude Van Damme, Forsman & Bodenfors keep us very entertained. This Swedish agency has done some amazing work in the past with notable clients such as Volvo, Unicef and Malibu Rum.

3) Lg2

lg2-logo

This creative agency based in Canada has some some very magical work that got us looking. Our favorite campaigns by lg2 have to be the ones for Festival de magie de Québec. They came up with amazing advertisements that actually seemed, well, magical. They made a mop appear to be controlled by telekinesis and made pigeons fly out of a large hat on top of a billboard.

4) Studio M

studiom-productions-logo

This small Canadian production shop was put on the map with their WestJet Christmas Miracle campaign. It was a campaign that went instantly viral because it was just so darn amazing. The campaign warmed our hearts and made us believe that marketing can actually bring us joy!

5) Jung von Matt

jung-von-matt-logo

Remember that one viral video that showed delivery companies mistakingly deliver large packages that said, “DHL is faster”? Well, that was done by Jung von Matt. Their DHL trojan mailing campaign was a huge success and they work with some very notable clients such as Mercedes-Benz, Nikon and Vodafone.

Be sure to check out our Guerrilla Marketing Agency Directory!

We launched a great resource for the guerrilla marketing community where you can find an agency in your area or list your agency to be discovered by the hundreds of thousands of readers on our site.

Visit the Guerrilla Marketing Agency Directory

Great Guerilla Marketing

What do the Blair Witch Project, Old Spice and Halfway, Oregon have in common? They’re home to some of the cleverest guerilla marketing campaigns ever known.

The term “guerilla marketing,” created by advertising executive Jay Conrad Levinson in 1984, describes the unusual and often cheeky tactics used in a down-low ad campaign. Although some guerilla marketing efforts fail spectacularly, when a campaign hits it big, the payoff is huge.

Check out these great guerilla marketing campaigns from the past and see how you can fit them into your advertising model.

Yes, Steven Has Our Attention Now

If you lived in New York City, Los Angeles or Chicago in 2006, then you probably know all about Steven, the dirty, immoral, two-timing, devious, poorly-endowed slimeball; and Emily, his (soon-to-be-ex) wife.

The billboard guerilla ad, which announced Emily’s seemingly personal discovery of Steven’s extramarital affair and first placed in Times Square, sent fingers flying all over the Internet. The secret? Steven and Emily were fictitious — the ads were actually placed by CourtTV, which was marketing the return of Parco P.I.

Old Spice

In a terrific example of using new media to promote an old brand, Old Spice got zesty with its 2010 guerilla marketing campaign. After all, men from all walks of life, from NC lawyers to TX construction workers, want to smell like a sexy guy with a great sense of humor! After nearly 200 online videos and tens of millions of YouTube views, Old Spice body wash sales more than doubled less than a month after the launch date.

The Blair Witch Project

Who better to implement a near-perfect guerilla marketing campaign than our friends from Hollywood, who know a thing or two about suspension of disbelief?

The Blair Witch campaign, which helped produce one of the most profitable movies of all time, began with the rumor that Maryland teens were disappearing as a result of the century-old Blair Witch. When the movie was released, everyone — and we mean everyone — was talking about it as one of the scariest films ever made.

Halfway to Fame

Want a new computer lab and a cool $110k? No problem: get in touch with the folks from Half.com and agree to take its name for a year. In 1999, Halfway, Oregon agreed to just such a proposal, and signs welcoming visitors to the small town announced Halfway as Half.com, “America’s First Dot-Com City”.

The Lowbrow Approach

No matter how sophisticated we think we are, there’s nothing like a good streaker to get our tongues wagging. That’s exactly what happened when Vodafone (not once, but twice) sent buck naked runners across well-attended sporting events with the Vodafone logo painted across their backs. Although the stunt didn’t earn much positive press at the time, we’re still talking about it 11 years later.

The point? For very little up-front money and a lot of daring and ingenuity, your guerilla marketing campaign can bring business in the door.

6 Great Guerrilla Marketing Campaigns

Each year, America spends about $250 billion on marketing and advertising — more than the entire GDP of Thailand. Too bad most of that money is a complete waste. For an increasingly savvy, TiVo-equipped public, our brains seem to shut down whenever something registers as “advertising.” Which means all those marketing creatives at the big ad firms have had no choice but to, well, get more creative.

Some advertisers have relied on product placement (think James Bond stopping mid-gunfight for a refreshing sip of Heineken). Others have attempted to make their ads so entertaining thatPeople will watch them in spite of the sales pitch. And then there’s the more mischievous route — the grassroots, take-it-to-the-streets method — and that’s where guerrilla marketing comes in.

Dirt-cheap and chock full of trickery, guerrilla marketing is advertising with a wink. The successful campaigns usually corral attention through subversive means before revealing their true purpose, and they distinguish themselves by being so clever that even once the bait and switch is revealed, there’s no negative outcry.

In other words, even though consumers know they’ve been duped, the reaction amounts to nothing more than a bashful, “Oh Pepsi! We can’t stay mad at you!”

And it’s with that good-humored and awe-inspired mindset that we pay homage to the best “gotcha” moments in advertising.

1) The Blair Witch Project

Arguably the most important aspect of a successful guerrilla campaign is staying one step ahead of the public. As consumers become more attuned to ad agency efforts, marketers have to figure out how to attack the mob from unexpected angles. The brand standard for catching the public off guard? 1999’s The Blair Witch Project. With no stars, no script, and a budget of around $50,000, University of Central Florida Film School pals Daniel Myrick and Eduardo Sánchez successfully scrubbed out the line between reality and fiction.

To ease the suspension of disbelief and stir up some buzz, Sánchez created a Web site devoted to the Blair Witch — a fictitious, woods-based specter who’d been snapping up Maryland kids for the last century. Although the legend was created out of whole cloth, it was soon snapped up by gullible Interneters everywhere, and a first-ballot hall of fame urban legend was born. Pretty soon, thousands of people were terrified of the Blair Witch. Even when the actors who played the “film students” started showing up (alive) doing interviews about the movie, many across the country refused to believe the Blair Witch wasn’t real.The film’s tagline set the stage: “In October of 1994, three student filmmakers disappeared in the woods near Burkittsville, Maryland, while shooting a documentary. A year later, their footage was found.” Audiences were expected to believe what they were watching — shaky, low-quality videotape of three runny-nosed kids weeping in the woods — was an edited-down version of real recovered footage. And while it was certainly an inventive way to challenge the boundaries of cinematic storytelling (not to mention justifying the low-budget look of the film), Blair Witch didn’t exactly seem poised to rival Titanic. That is, until an inventive guerrilla marketing scheme was devised.

From that point, the “I’ve got to see for myself” effect took over, and Blair Witch dominated at the box office. Considered the most effective horror hoax since Orson Welles’ The War Of The Worlds broadcast, the film grossed $250 million worldwide. Not a bad return for Artisan Entertainment, which paid only $1 million for the flick after its Sundance screening.

2) Médecins du Monde

Not all guerrilla campaigns are about the money. In fact, one of the cleverest and most altruistic grassroots marketing efforts was pulled off by a group called Médecins du Monde — an international humanitarian organization devoted to providing care for vulnerable populations around the world.

In late 2005, the French branch of the organization staged an extremely effective campaign to draw attention to the plight of the homeless in Paris. Christened the “tent city” initiative, the group distributed some 300 “two-second tents” to destitute Parisians sleeping outdoors. Equipped with the rapid-deploying tents (which didn’t require poles or pins), the homeless gathered in small groups of eight to 10 along the Quai d’Austerlitz and the Canal Saint-Martin. The prefab shelter, which bore the Médecins du Monde logo, drew immediate attention to the number of homeless people in the area and provoked such incredible public outrage that the city was forced to act. A rare off-season government session was convened, and officials admitted that Paris’ homeless shelters were vastly overcrowded. They immediately announced the allocation of nearly $10 million for emergency housing.

3) Half.com

The thing about Internet domain names is that they’re frequently difficult to remember. They have “krayzee” spellings, or “numb3rs” in them, or they’re only tangentially related to the products they offer. (What does “fogdog” have to do with sports equipment, anyway?) And in 1999, name recognition was one of the main problems facing half.com, an eBay-esque online marketplace that allows people to sell used items for fixed prices without the hassle of an auction. “There is such a dot-com clutter out there,” half.com CEO Joshua Kopelman said at the time. “We wanted to do something innovative to get some visibility in the crowd.”

That something turned out to be giving the 360-person town of Halfway, Oregon, $100,000 and a new computer lab to rename itself half.com for one year. When media outlets picked up the story, half.com (both town and Web site) got some much-needed publicity. Within weeks of its launch, the site was covered by the Today show, The Wall Street Journal, and The New York Times. Time magazine even called the renaming arrangement “one of the greatest publicity coups in history.”

The man who literally put half.com on the map was the site’s then VP of marketing, Mark Hughes. Hughes, who is now proprietor of buzzmarketing.com, managed to generate so much publicity for half.com that only three weeks after the renaming was announced, eBay snapped it up for a cool $313 million. And while half.com is probably the most successful town/product renaming event in history, it’s not the only one. In 1950, Hot Springs, New Mexico, rechristened itself Truth or Consequences after a popular game show, and in 2005, Clark, Texas, decided to go by DISH, Texas, in exchange for a decade of free satellite TV.

4) Acclaim Entertainment

Nowhere are the semi-criminal aspects of guerrilla marketing more important than in pitching to videogamers. Regular folks might occasionally enjoy being duped by an unusually clever campaign, but gamers seem to suck down daring and deception like a Big Gulp of Mountain Dew. The more the stunts flaunt the law, the more the gaming demographic seems to like them.

The undisputed high-score holder in this renegade arena is Acclaim Entertainment, a plucky little company that began as a one-room outfit in Oyster Bay, New York, and bloomed into a multinational juggernaut. Eschewing artistry in favor of an “all publicity is good publicity” philosophy, Acclaim stirs up the stuffy types — and then laughs all the way to the bank. One of its bedrock tactics is to offer people money for performing some insane stunt on behalf of its upcoming game. Prior to the release of “Turok: Evolution,” for instance, the company offered £500 to the first five U.K. citizens who’d legally change their names to Turok. (Almost 3,000 people tried to claim the prize.) Later, promoting the release of “Shadow Man 2,” Acclaim announced it would pay the relatives of the recently deceased to place promotional ads on the headstones of their dearly departed. The company said the promotional fee might “particularly interest poorer families.”

The latter campaign was, of course, shouted down. But Acclaim blew it off and said the whole thing was a joke — right after its name had been conveniently plastered all over the headlines. In fact, many of the company’s schemes are designed to die on the vine that way. Acclaim actually counts on law enforcement and city officials to shut down their antics — preferably as publicly as possible. In 2002, the company announced its plans to promote “Gladiator: Sword of Vengeance” using something called “bloodvertising.” Touting it as the bloodiest game of all time, Acclaim said it was developing bus shelter ads that would seep a red, blood-like substance onto city sidewalks throughout the course of seven days. Officials thought that might not be in the best taste, so the campaign was aborted, as the world looked on. Also in 2002, Acclaim offered to pay all speeding tickets incurred in the U.K. on the day its racing game “Burnout 2” was released. Naturally, the bobbies balked, feeling that removing the consequences for speeding might encourage people to speed. Acclaim judiciously rescinded the offer, but, yet again, not before the name “Burnout 2” was burned into the public consciousness.

5) Vodafone

While some guerrilla campaigns border on art — baffling consumers with their cocky blend of ingenuity and imagination — others take a more boorish approach. During the 2002 Bledisloe Cup rugby match, for example, two young men suddenly burst onto the field at a crucial moment and ran across the pitch wearing nothing but the Vodafone logo painted on their backs.

Admittedly, streaking at a rugby match isn’t exactly uncommon, but sponsored streaking very much is. Adding to the drama? The fact that the match was held in Telstra Stadium — Telstra being Vodafone’s competitor.

In the end, one of the streakers was fined $3,500 (AUS), and a maelstrom of criticism was directed at Vodafone. However, millions of TV viewers witnessed the event live, and it was covered everywhere from CNN to the front page of the The Times in London. For a company seeking to sell itself as young and brash, such backlash was a ringing endorsement.

6) Obey: Andre The Giant Has A Posse

Most marketing ploys are created to promote a product, but the global rash of stickers, posters, and stencils reading “Andre The Giant Has A Posse” exist only to urge people to question their surroundings. In essence, it’s an ad campaign against advertising.

As subversive as it is pervasive, what became known as the “Obey Giant” campaign began when Rhode Island School of Design art student Shepard Fairey made a bunch of stickers and started putting them up around Providence. Mimicking Soviet-style propaganda posters, the stickers featured the unlikely visage of late professional wrestler Andre “The Giant” Roussimoff accompanied by messages like “Obey” and “Andre the Giant Has A Posse.” The stickers’ message was unclear — yet clearly counterculture. It resonated with local skateboarders, rockers, and other underground types, and soon, many were asking to join in the fun. The stickers spread underground to New York, Los Angeles, and Boston, and within a few years, they were all over the world.

The Obey Giant campaign is the kind of thing that, once you see it for the first time, you start to see it everywhere. The stickers are hip and cryptic, and they capitalize on the fact that most people think it’s cool to be part of something not everyone understands. Beyond that, the campaign does have a high-minded mission — to create a kind of emptiness in the observer. The propaganda orders a person to do something (“obey”), but the viewer doesn’t know what to do or how to obey. Fairey hopes this confusion will make people question other directives they receive visually — namely, in ads.

These days, Fairey heads up a design and marketing company that reps youth-targeted brands, such as Pepsi and Universal Pictures. An anti-advertising ad campaign staged by a big-shot advertiser? It doesn’t get much more guerrilla than that.

122 Must See Guerilla Marketing Examples

As creative thinkers we have to think of new and exciting ways to grab people’s attention every day. Sometimes it is by going bigger. Perhaps it’s by coming up with a better social media marketing strategy.

In order to find some creative advertising inspiration, I decided to search the web for the best examples of guerrilla marketing I could find. Below you’ll find 122 examples of creative marketing campaigns.

For those of you who are unfamiliar with the term, guerrilla marketing, you can find a detailed explanation on our ‘What is Guerrilla Marketing‘ page.

Here are some other great compilation articles we think you might enjoy!

Here’s a showcase of some amazing examples of Guerilla marketing.

Nikon Guerilla Marketing Campaign

Guerrilla Marketing - Creative Attention Seeking - Nikon

Swiss Skydive Guerilla Marketing Campaign

Guerrilla Marketing - Creative Attention Seeking - Swiss Skydive

Fitness First Guerilla Marketing Campaign

Guerrilla Marketing - Creative Attention Seeking - Fitness First

Sharpie Guerilla Marketing Campaign

Guerrilla Marketing - Creative Attention Seeking - Sharpie

Wii Guerilla Marketing Campaign

Guerrilla Marketing - Creative Attention Seeking - wii

Discovery Channel Guerilla Marketing Campaign

Guerrilla Marketing - Creative Attention Seeking - Discovery Channel

Peugeot 308 Guerilla Marketing Campaign

Guerrilla Marketing - Creative Attention Seeking - Peugeot 308

Stop Global Warming Guerilla Marketing Campaign

Guerrilla Marketing - Creative Attention Seeking - Stop Global Warming

Unicef  Guerilla Marketing Campaign

Guerrilla Marketing - Creative Attention Seeking - Unicef

Extra Thin Schnitzel Guerilla Marketing Campaign

Guerrilla Marketing - Creative Attention Seeking - Extra Thin Schnitzel

Duracell Guerilla Marketing Campaign

Guerrilla Marketing - Creative Attention Seeking - Duracell

Bounty Guerilla Marketing Campaign

Guerrilla Marketing - Creative Attention Seeking - Bounty

Charmin Guerilla Marketing Campaign

Guerrilla Marketing - Creative Attention Seeking - Charmin

Tyskie Beer Advertisement

Guerrilla Marketing - Creative Attention Seeking - Tyskie

Toyota Ambient Ad

Guerrilla Marketing - Creative Attention Seeking - Toyota

Dubai Healthcare City

Guerrilla Marketing - Creative Attention Seeking - Dubai Healthcare City

National Geographic Museum

Guerrilla Marketing - Creative Attention Seeking - National Geographic Museum

Maximum Ride

Guerrilla Marketing - Creative Attention Seeking - Maximum Ride

Elmex

Guerrilla Marketing - Creative Attention Seeking - Elmex

Guerrilla Marketing – Creative Attention Seeking #2

Arkaden

Guerrilla Marketing – Creative Attention Seeking #2 - Arkaden

Audi Garage Advertisement

Guerrilla Marketing – Creative Attention Seeking #2 - Audi

Israel Cancer Association

Guerrilla Marketing – Creative Attention Seeking #2 - Israel Cancer Association

Elmex

Guerrilla Marketing – Creative Attention Seeking #2 - Elmex

Jif

Guerrilla Marketing – Creative Attention Seeking #2 - Jif

Parkinson’s Victoria

Guerrilla Marketing – Creative Attention Seeking #2 - Parkinsons Victoria

Vodafone Phone Insurance

Guerrilla Marketing – Creative Attention Seeking #2 - Vodafone Phone Insurance

Planetarium Prague

Guerrilla Marketing – Creative Attention Seeking #2 - Planetarium Prague

Dove

Guerrilla Marketing – Creative Attention Seeking #2 - Dove

Kleenex

Guerrilla Marketing – Creative Attention Seeking #2 - Kleenex

Rexona

Guerrilla Marketing – Creative Attention Seeking #2 - Rexona

McDonalds

Guerrilla Marketing – Creative Attention Seeking #2 - McDonalds

Coca Cola Light

Guerrilla Marketing – Creative Attention Seeking #2 - Coca Cola light

Beau Rivage Resort Casino

Guerrilla Marketing – Creative Attention Seeking #2 - Beau Rivage Resort & Casino

Divine Body Piercing

Guerrilla Marketing – Creative Attention Seeking #2 - Divine Body Piercing

Guerrilla Marketing – Creative Attention Seeking #3

North Face

Guerrilla Marketing – Creative Attention Seeking #3 - North Face

The Samaritans

Guerrilla Marketing – Creative Attention Seeking #3 - Samaritans

Volkswagen

Guerrilla Marketing – Creative Attention Seeking #3 - Volkswagen

Fairfax

Guerrilla Marketing – Creative Attention Seeking #3 - Fairfax

Tnuve Mini Cheese

Guerrilla Marketing – Creative Attention Seeking #3 - Tnuva

Rentokil

Guerrilla Marketing – Creative Attention Seeking #3 - Rentokil

IKEA

Guerrilla Marketing – Creative Attention Seeking #3 - IKEA

Golf GTI

Guerrilla Marketing – Creative Attention Seeking #3 - Golf GTI

Weight Watchers

Guerrilla Marketing – Creative Attention Seeking #3 - Weight Watchers

Guinness

Guerrilla Marketing – Creative Attention Seeking #3 - Guinness

2012 Movie Advertisement

Guerrilla Marketing – Creative Attention Seeking #3 - 2012

Project Cuddle

Guerrilla Marketing – Creative Attention Seeking #3 - Project Cuddle

Colgate

Guerrilla Marketing – Creative Attention Seeking #3 - Colgate

Dublin City Council

Guerrilla Marketing – Creative Attention Seeking #3 - Dublin City Council

Creative Coca-Cola Bus Stop Ad

Guerrilla Marketing – Creative Attention Seeking #3 - Coke

DHL Billboard Campaign

Guerrilla Marketing – Creative Attention Seeking #3 - DHL

IKEA

Guerrilla Marketing – Creative Attention Seeking #3 - IKEA

Prison Break

Guerrilla Marketing – Creative Attention Seeking #3 - Prison Break

Landmine Ketchup

Guerrilla Marketing – Creative Attention Seeking #3 - Landmine Ketchup

Guerrilla Marketing – Creative Attention Seeking #4

Panasonic Vaccum

Panasonic Vaccum

Karate Club

Karate Club

Patricia Cornwell

Patricia Cornwell

Ford F-150

Ford F-150

Meralco

Meralco

Breast Cancer Asia

Breast Cancer Asia

Forma Total Gym

Forma Total Gym

Tattooed Mirror

Tattooed Mirror

Dirty Cards

Dirty Cards

Skin Cancer Towel

Skin Cancer Towel

Cesviamo Stop Aids

Cesviamo Stop Aids

Copenhagen Zoo

Copenhagen Zoo

Twilight: Outdoor Vampire Victims

Twilight: Outdoor Vampire Victims

Lynx Schedule

Lynx Schedule

Unicef Turn Soldiers Back Into Children

Unicef Turn Soldiers Back Into Children

Kukkiwon World Taekwondo Headquarters

Kukkiwon World Taekwondo Headquarters

Apple Calendar

Apple Calender

Alfa Romeo

Alfa Romeo

Alzheimer’s Hamburg

Alzheimer's Hamburg

Land Rover

Land Rover

Citroen

Citroen

Alfa Romeo

Alfa Romeo

Sweet And Lovely Style For You

Sweet And Lovely Style For You

Shumensko

Shumensko

First Hug

First Hug

Jump! 15th Birthday Magazine Ad

Jump!

Toyota Yaris

Toyota Yaris

Dog Training

Dog Training

Skin Cancer

Skin Cancer

Mortien

Mortien

WWF

WWF

Keskin Rims

Keskin Rims
Urban Island

Indonesian Railways

Indonesian Railways

Unicef

Unicef

Hung

Hung

Sporting Association For The Disabled

Sporting Association For The Disabled

Car Screech

Car Screech

Cover Girl Lash Blast

Cover Girl Lash Blast

USO Exhaust Systems

USO Exhaust Systems

Nivea Bench

Nivea Bench

ID&T Proper White

ID&T Proper White

Dos En Uno Balloon

Dos En Uno Balloon

Hung

Hung

Stihl Leaf Blowers

Stihl Leaf Blowers

Fitness World

Fitness World

Go Back To Pompeii

Go Back To Pompeii

Axe Effect

Axe Effect

Swiss Cancer Foundation

Swiss Cancer Foundation

Studio Universal Calendar

Studio Universal Calendar

Its Ur Call

Its Ur Call

Wong Dog Food

Wong Dog Food

Anti Corruption Soap

Anti Corruption Soap

Grand Prix UV Protector

Grand Prix UV Protector

Plastic Pollution Coalition

Plastic Pollution Coalition

Ariel

Ariel

Flying Car

Flying Car

Lenor

Lenor

King Kong 3D

King Kong 3D

Ford Mustang

Ford Mustang

Companhia Athletica Calendar

Companhia Athletica Calendar

Lipton Clear Green

Lipton Clear Green

Skoda

Skoda

Alan Wake

Alan Wake

Dinosaurs Alive

Dinosaurs Alive

Save The Trees

Save The Trees Guerilla Marketing Example

What do you think of these examples? Let us know by commenting be low! Be sure to share it with your friends if you enjoyed this set!